New Zealand Customs – announces new laws concerning the importation of Tobacco Products

When you import or bring tobacco products into New Zealand, you must comply with New Zealand laws. You must pay all relevant taxes on your imported tobacco at the border.

From 1 July 2020, tobacco products, tobacco leaf and tobacco refuse will become prohibited imports and you will be required to have a permit to import these products.

Permits are approved and issued by Customs. That means if you want to send someone in New Zealand any kind of tobacco product including as a gift, you will have to apply for a permit.

Also from 1 July 2020 you cannot receive any tobacco products through the international mail. Tobacco must only be imported using a freight forwarder, the fast-freight courier system or as bulk sea or air cargo. You will still be able to use New Zealand Post’s international courier service.

Customs will issue a permit to established importers for one year from 1 July or the length of time a manufacturer holds a licence to manufacture tobacco products. Other importers will need to apply for a permit.  Permits will be issued free of charge. 

From 1 July 2020, any tobacco products, leaf or refuse imported without a permit will be seized and destroyed. Customs will send a written notice to importers confirming the seizure and destruction of the tobacco products, leaf and refuse. In the unlikely event of the product being seized and destroyed in error (for example, when the person had a valid permit to import), the importer will be entitled to compensation for the customs value of the products.

A permit is not required to import cigars, cigarillos, water-pipe tobacco, chewing tobacco, snuff and snus.

Passengers arriving into New Zealand with tobacco do not need a permit and individual duty-free tobacco limits are unchanged. More information about duty-free limits and FAQs are available to download.

Source: New Zealand Customs Service, 22 May 2020

Inside track to the local Tobacco ‘Cabal’

Peter Tell-AllWith much international focus on tobacco and tobacco products its great to read something outside of the mainstream media. Evidently this guy has some real insight in the tobacco industry and he sure is passionate about his views. This is a fine example of ‘Social Media’ providing what your average Google search-and-hit will never reveal. Conspiracy theory or not, this is a site dedicated to one thing – exposing the ‘Anglo-American tobacco cabal’. Aptly titled “All Disclosed by Peter Tell(all)” he invites you………

…………… to browse, interact and explore my website dedicated to the exposure of facts, truths and the responsible sharing of the information contained within these pages, about South Africa’s Tobacco Industry! The compilation of articles and also unpublished fact sheets about how this very lucrative and secretive industry operates has up until now been a very dark and well-kept secret! Why would all this information be kept from us? Why would they not want us to know how much money is being made? Why does the Government play both sides of the fence? Who pulls the strings of the authorities? THESE ARE THE QUESTIONS WE SHOULD BE ASKING!!

Tobacco in South Africa

smoke-cigaretteCigarette volume sales increase in 2011 – Retail volume sales grew by 1% in 2011, following declines throughout the review period. Retail value sales grew significantly due to a general price increase to cater for taxation increases, as well as rising production costs for manufacturers.

Porous borders continue to influence the growth of illicit cigarette sales – Volume sales of illicit cigarettes continued to grow during 2011, despite efforts by the police and tobacco industry stakeholders to combat illicit trade. Porous borders have been identified as the key factor behind the rise in the amount of illegal cigarettes being smuggled into the country. The Beitbridge border post between South Africa and Zimbabwe was identified as the main point of entry for illicit cigarettes from Zimbabwe.

High import duties restrict the growth of the cigars category – The performance of the cigars category remains suppressed due to high import duties on all cigars. The unit price on most cigars increased significantly in 2011 to accommodate import duty increases. Local distributors were reluctant to import new cigar brands due to a low turnover for existing brands. Consumption of cigars declined in 2011 due to higher unit prices for leading brands, with only festive seasons seeing some respite.

Consumers continue to favour buying tobacco products from supermarkets – The supermarkets channel remains the major point of access for most tobacco products in South Africa. Supermarkets tend to sell tobacco products at relatively low profit margins when contrasted with other channels, such as tobacco specialists. With the rising cost of living, smokers still prefer to use supermarkets to buy tobacco products due to the lower prices.

Retail volume sales expected to decline over the forecast period – Slower but relatively stable growth is expected for retail plus illicit volume sales over the forecast period, however retail sales alone are expected to decline. Category performance is expected to be restricted by legislative restrictions, such as a ban on the advertising of tobacco products in any way other than at points of sale. The Government of South Africa is also considering a total ban on the display of tobacco products at points of sale. Thus, retail volumes are expected to decline, while illicit sales will continue to rise during the forecast period.

For a meagre sum of US$1,900 why not purchase the full report Discover the latest market trends and uncover sources of future market growth for the Tobacco industry in South Africa with research from Euromonitor‘s team of in-country analysts. Find hidden opportunities in the most current research data available, understand competitive threats with detailed market analysis, and plan your corporate strategy with expert qualitative analysis and growth projections. If you’re in the Tobacco industry in South Africa, this research will save time and money, empowering informed, profitable decisions – so the blah says.

Source: Euromonitor.com