Books to make you better understand the Shipping Industry

Luc Castera founder of Octopi, a tech company in the logistics industry, has recommended a series books to broaden culture and learning about the shipping industry. Ninety percent of everything around you was carried over on a shipping container before it reached you. It’s the industry that puts food in your plate, clothes on your back and enables the success of e-commerce globally. Yet, very few companies are trying to solve the hard problems facing this industry, says Octopi co-founder Luc Castera. If you are new to this industry, or if you have been working it in for 20 years and believe that learning should be constant, Luc highly recommends the following books.

1. The Docks by Bill Sharpsteen

Focusing on the Port of Los Angeles, The Docks delves into the unseen world of this highly successful enterprise. Author Bill Sharpsteen paints a picture of the port’s origins, zeroing in on the people that helped contribute to its economic prosperity. While Sharpsteen emphasizes the Port’s success, he also talks about its vulnerability with security and labor, while including personal stories from industry insiders. One perspective he includes is that of one of the first women longshoremen. The Docks demonstrates the energy behind this incredible port through dramatic photographs and personal perspectives.

2. The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson

The Box tells the story of the container and its beginnings. What started as a simple box, changed the future of the shipping and transportation industries collectively. The container idea was slow on the uptake and economist Mark Levinson tells the story of how, after a decade of struggle, it came to fruition and changed the transport industry for good. Levinson includes key notes about how the inclusion of the “box” brought some ports back to life, whereas others suffered with its implementation. Thanks to this extraordinary box, costs were cut in the transport sector and the global economy is able to thrive, today.

3. Port Management and Operations by Maria G. Burns

Port Management and Operations has created a manual filled with insights and strategies into the world of shipping. Through examination of port management practices on a global level and deconstructing them on commercial and technological levels, this manual provides readers with a new set of skills and perspective. Port Management and Operations touches on 4 themes: “Port Strategy and Structure, Legal and Regulatory Framework, Input: Factors of Production, and Output and Economic Framework.” This book also identifies strategies and provides insight into the future of shipping.

4. Port Business by Jurgen Sorgenfrei

For veterans or those just starting out in the shipping industry, this book breaks down the meaning of ports and explains the role they play in the global supply chain. With globalization, exporting has increased exponentially, and the shipping market is changing. Port Business breaks down and analyzes the struggles for small to mega-sized ports, providing insight into the industry’s future.

5. The Travels of a T-Shirt in the Global Economy by Pietra Rivoli

Through the perspective of a T-shirt, this narrative has a lot to say about globalization and international business. Following a T-shirt from Texas to Africa, author Pietra Rivoli reveals political, cultural, economic, and moral issues associated with international business. The reader is challenged to view trade through an unconventional perspective while evaluating the complex layers of business crossing borders.

6.The Shipping Man by Matthew McCleery

Matthew McCleery tells the story of a hedge fund manager turned shipping man. After deciding to buy a ship on a whim, Robert Fairchild enters the complex world of shipping. A stark contrast to his New York life, Fairchild embarks on a journey where he learns about everything from Somali pirates to the wealthy folk of Wall Street. Though he ends up losing his hedge fund, he gains the title of shipping man along with the knowledge associated with it.

7. Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car, and Food on Your Plate by Rose George

Ninety Percent of Everything unveils the invisible world of shipping to the commoner’s eye. Author Rose George divulges the secrets of the “invisible industry” through her incredible adventure sailing from southern England to Singapore. Five weeks aboard The Maersk Kendal and countless miles later, George lets readers into the shipping industry from the perspective of someone with little experience. Her objective in writing this tell-all piece is to shed light on the otherwise closed-door industry and to inform consumers about the shipping life and all that entails.

Published by Maritime Executive, Luc Castera, August 23, 2017

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South Africa falls in 2014 global logistics rankings

jll_year_of_the_distribution_center_wide_imageSouth Africa has been ranked number 34 out of 160 countries in the World Bank’s 2014 Logistics Performance Index (LPI), which is topped by Germany, with Somalia ranked lowest. Africa’s largest economy remained the continent’s highest placed LPI participant, but South Africa’s position was well off its 2012 ranking of 23 and its position of 28 in 2010.

In February, the World Bank argued in a separate report on South Africa that the country’s high logistics costs and price distortions were an impediment to export competitiveness. That report noted, for instance, that South Africa’s port tariffs on containers were 360% above the global average in 2012, while on bulk commodities they were 19% to 43% below the global average. Similar commodity biases existed in the area of rail freight.

But the new report, titled ‘Connecting to Compete 2014: Trade Logistics in the Global Economy’, still clustered South Africa as an “over-performing non-high-income” economy along with Malaysia (25), China (28), Thailand (35), Vietnam (48) and India (54).

The report draws on data arising from a survey of more than 1 000 logistics professionals and bases its LPI rankings on a number of trade dimensions, such as customs performance, infrastructure quality, and timeliness of shipments. Besides China, South Arica also performed above its ‘Brics’ counterparts of Brazil (65),Russia (90) and India.

Germany was followed in the top 10 by other developed economies, namely Netherlands, Belgium, the UK, Singapore,Sweden, Norway, Luxembourg, the US and Japan. Among low-income countries, Malawi, Kenya and Rwanda showed the highest performance.

The report warns that the gap between the countries that perform best and worst in trade logistics remains large, despite a slow convergence since 2007. The gap persists, the study asserts, because of the complexity of logistics-related reforms and investment in developing countries. This, despite strong recognition that poor supply-chain efficiency is the main barrier to trade integration.

However, senior transport economist and founder of the LPI project Jean-François Arvis stresses that a country cannot improve through developing infrastructure, while failing to address border management and other supply-chain issues.

Logistics performance is strongly associated with the reliability of supply chains and the predictability of service delivery for producers and exporters, the report notes, adding that supply chains are only as strong as their weakest links. They are also becoming more and more complex, often spanning many countries while remaining critical to national competitiveness.

“It’s difficult to get everything right. The projects are more complicated, with many stakeholders, and there is no more low-hanging fruit,” Arvis argues.

The report also finds that low-income, middle-income and high-income countries will also need to adopt different strategies to improve their standings in logistics performance. “Comprehensive reforms and long-term commitments from policymakers and private stakeholders will be essential. Here, the LPI provides a unique reference to better understand key trade logistics impediments worldwide.” Source: Engineering News

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Pravin Gordhan named Finance Minister of the Year

Pravin Gordhan - Finance Minister of the Year 2013 (Mail & Guardian)

Pravin Gordhan – Finance Minister of the Year 2013 (Mail & Guardian)

Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan (former chairperson of the World Customs Organisation) has been named the Finance Minister of the Year for 2013 in sub-Saharan Africa by the Emerging Markets website, the finance ministry said on Sunday.

The website’s citation stated that Gordhan, appointed in 2009 at the height of the economic crisis, had been praised by analysts, the ministry said in a statement.

This was because South Africa especially was more exposed than other emerging markets to dangers stemming from the eventual pullback of quantitative easing by the US’s Federal Reserve.

Emerging Markets provides news, analysis and commentary on economic policy, international economics and global financial markets, with a special focus on emerging markets.

In his acceptance speech in Washington DC, where he has been attending the annual meetings of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, Gordhan thanked Emerging Markets for its recognition of South Africa and its economic team.

‘We are terrible managers’
“Minister Gordhan was critical of the sudden change in the narrative about emerging markets, which up until the second quarter of this year were praised for managing their economies very well,” the ministry said.

“[Emerging markets contributed] more than 50% to global economic growth and for lifting large numbers of people above the poverty line.”

Gordhan said: “Three months later, we are apparently fragile and we are terrible managers of our economies. We the emerging markets are here to stay.

“We live in an interconnected world, and more importantly, we live in an interdependent world. There is no decoupling from you, the advanced economies, and there is no decoupling from us, the emerging markets.” Source: Mail & Guardian/Sapa