China Customs – New Valuation Regulations

February 28, 2014 — Leave a comment

China Customs EmblemImportant information regarding customs valuation in respect of imports and exports in the People’s Republic of China.

The General Administration of Customs of the People’s Republic of China (“GAC”) issued two new regulations on customs valuation, both effective from 1 February 2014. GAC Order No. 213 (“Order 213”), entitled Measures of Customs of the People’s Republic of China for the Determination of Dutiable Value of Imports and Exports, will replace the existing regulation with the same title issued under GAC Order No. 148 on 28 March 2006 (“Order 148”). In addition, GAC Order No. 211 (“Order 211”), entitled Measures of Customs of the People’s Republic of China for the Determination of Dutiable Value of Domestic Sales of Bonded Goods, is an entirely new regulation specifically providing for the valuation of bonded goods sold within the territory of China.

Briefly, the abovementioned Orders cover the following issues –

  • Customs may consider the circumstances of a sale in determining the acceptability of transaction value between related parties.
  • Calculation of international freight for imported goods.
  • Commissions in the valuation of exported goods.
  • Bonded materials or finished goods (including defective and substandard goods) sold by a contract manufacturer located within the territory of China.
  • Bonded waste and scrap materials, by-products and residue after accidents sold by a contract manufacturer located within the territory of China.
  • Bonded goods transferred under deep processing and sold by the transferee.
  • Bonded materials or finished goods sold by a manufacturer located within a customs bonded area.
  • Bonded scrap, defective or substandard products and by-products sold by a manufacturer located within a customs bonded area.
  • Bonded goods imported into a customs bonded area for logistics, inspection and exhibition purposes and sold within the territory of China.
  • Bonded goods for Research and Development (“R&D”) in a customs bonded area and sold within the territory of China.

 For more details, read the full analysis at Baker & MacKenzie’s website.

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