New Zealand releases trade implementation guidelines for GOVCBR

January 19, 2012 — Leave a comment

New Zealand Customs ServiceThe New Zealand Customs Service has recently released draft guidelines for it’s Trade Single Window (TSW), which is currently under development. This will require all potential users to be able to send and receive electronic messages. The introduction of the TSW therefore means that organisations will need to submit lodgement messages that meet the WCO3 data model. Current message format for import entries, export entries, inward and outward cargo reports, will be accepted for 18 months after TSW is introduced (likely to be in the first quarter of 2013). However, following that 18-month period, all users of TSW will need to have adopted the new NZ WCO version 3 data model for messages.

New Zealand Customs expects that some users of TSW may adopt the new messages earlier to take advantage of the benefits, which include the ability to submit cargo manifest and Customs data in one message.To understand the new messages, a draft set of message implementation guidelines is now available for consultation and feedback from software developers and companies intending to use the TSW on the following draft messages:

  • Advance Notice of Arrival
  • Advance Notice of Departure
  • Cargo Report Export
  • Excise Declaration
  • Inward Cargo Report
  • Import Declaration
  • Outward Cargo Report
  • Border Agency Response Message.

Message implantation guidelines for the new export declaration is still be drafted, and will be made available as soon as possible.

Five main government agencies operate at the border – the Customs Service, the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, the Department of Labour, the Ministry of Transport, and the Department of Internal Affairs. With the participation of almost 20 other associated agencies, they work to prevent the traffic of prohibited goods and materials in and out of the country. They also collect government revenue, promote travel and trade, support New Zealand’s national interests, and uphold international laws and agreements. Now, as the border sector grows more complex and volumes of goods and travellers increase, a new era of inter-agency collaboration aims for more control, easier flows, and greater efficiency. Source – New Zealand Customs Service

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