RhinoA new report released by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) partner TRAFFIC reveals that illegal rhino horn trade has reached the highest levels since the early 1990s, and illegal trade in ivory increased by nearly 300 percent from 1998 to 2011.

The report, Illegal trade in ivory and rhino horn: an assessment to improve law enforcement, is a key step to achieving USAID’s vision to adapt and deploy a range of development tools and interventions to significantly reduce illegal wildlife trafficking, USAID said in a September 22 press release. The report was prepared by the wildlife monitoring network TRAFFIC in partnership with USAID. The assessment uses robust analysis to identify capacity gaps and key intervention points in countries combating wildlife trafficking.

Seizure data indicate that “the fundamental trade dynamic now lies between Africa and Asia,” according to the report. In China and Thailand, elephant ivory is fashioned into jewellery and carved into other decorative items, while wealthy consumers in Vietnam use rhino horn as a drug that they mistakenly believe cures hangovers and detoxifies the body.

Rhinos and elephants are under serious poaching pressure throughout Africa, with even previously safe populations collapsing. Central Africa’s forest elephants have been reduced by an estimated 76 percent over the past 12 years, while in Tanzania’s Selous Game Reserve elephant numbers have fallen from 70,000 in 2007 to only 13,000 by late 2013. A record 1,004 rhinos were poached in 2013 in South Africa alone, a stark contrast to the 13 animals poached there in 2007 before the latest crisis began.

Record quantities of ivory were seized worldwide between 2011 and 2013, with an alarming increase in the frequency of large-scale ivory seizures (500 kg or more) since 2000. Preliminary data already show more large-scale ivory seizures in 2013 than in the previous 25 years. Although incomplete, 2013 raw data already represent the greatest quantity of ivory in these seizures in more than 25 years.

Both rhino horn and ivory trafficking are believed to function as Asian-run, African-based operations, with the syndicates increasingly relying on sophisticated technology to run their operations. In order to disrupt and apprehend the individuals behind them, the global response needs to be equally sophisticated, USAID said.

“There’s no single solution to addressing the poaching crisis in Africa, and while the criminals master-minding and profiting from the trafficking have gotten smarter, so too must enforcement agencies, who need to improve collaborative efforts in order to disrupt the criminal syndicates involved in this illicit trade,” says Nick Ahlers, the leader of the Wildlife Trafficking, Response, Assessment and Priority Setting (Wildlife-TRAPS) Project.

The USAID-funded Wildlife-TRAPS Project seeks to transform the level of cooperation among those affected by illegal wildlife trade between Africa and Asia.

Rhino horn is often smuggled by air, using international airports as transit points between source countries in Africa and demand countries in Asia. Since 2009, the majority of ivory shipments have involved African seaports, increasingly coming out of East Africa. As fewer than 5 percent of export containers are examined in seaports, wildlife law enforcement relies greatly on gathering and acting on intelligence to detect illegal ivory shipments.

The report recommends further developing coordinated, specialized intelligence units to disrupt organized criminal networks by identifying key individuals and financial flows and making more high-level arrests. Also critically important are improved training, law enforcement technology, and monitoring judiciary processes at key locations in Africa and Asia.

The full text of the report (PDF, 1.6MB) is available on the USAID website. Source: USAID

Thomas Swahibi Moyane - Newly appointed Commissioner of the South African Revenue Services

Thomas Swahibi Moyane – Newly appointed Commissioner of the South African Revenue Services

The President of the Republic of South Africa, Mr Jacob Zuma, has in terms of section 6 of the South African Revenue Services Act, 1997, appointed Mr Thomas (Tom) Swabihi Moyane as a Commissioner of the South African Revenue Services. Mr Moyane’s appointment is with effect from 27 September 2014.

Mr Moyane, a development economist, recently served as the advisor on turnaround and security strategies at the State Information Technology Agency (SITA).

His qualifications include a BSc Economics from the Eduardo Mondlane University in Mozambique, Diploma in consulting to small Business from the University of the Witwatersrand, and certificates in Strategic Management, Managing Markets from Henley, Micro-economics from London School of Economics and Mastering Finance from GIBS.

Mr Moyane will bring more than 30 years’ experience to the position, having worked as a senior executive in various government and private sector entities.

Mr Moyane has served as National Commissioner at the Department of Correctional Services, as Chief Executive Officer for the Government Printing Works, as managing director for Engen Mozambique as well as regional coordinator for the regional spatial development initiatives and as chief director for industry and enterprise development at the department of trade and industry. During his period in exile he worked for government departments in Mozambique and Guinea Bissau.

The President has wished Mr Moyane well in his new responsibility of steering SARS to the future.

Mr Moyane said: I thank the President and the Minister of Finance, Mr Nhlanhla Nene for the confidence they have bestowed upon me. I look forward to working with the successful team at SARS to assist to take forward all priority development programmes and policies. Source: Office of the Presidency

Dube Tradeport will be officially launched as an Industrial Development Zone (IDZ) by President Zuma on Tuesday 7 October.

At the launch event, the Dube Tradeport will officially be handed over an operator permit which provides them the status of an IDZ.

Situated at the Dube Centre, King Shaka International Airport, Durban, it was designated as an IDZ on 1 July 2014 by the Minister of Trade and Industry, Dr Rob Davies.

Davies says, “The Dube Tradeport IDZ will be launched during a period of transition wherein Industrial Development Zones as governed by the Manufacturing Development Act will become Special Economic Zones (SEZ) under the new Special Economic Zones Act 16 of 2014.”
According to Davies, the Act has been assented to by the President, and will come into effect before the end of 2014.

Davies adds, “The main areas that have designated as Dube Tradeport Industrial Development Zone (DTPIDZ) are Dube Agrizone and Dube Tradeport. Dube Agrizone is about 63.5 hectares and focuses on high-value, niche agricultural and horticultural products while Dube Tradezone which is 240.27 hectares focuses on manufacturing and value-addition primarily for automotive, electronic, fashion garments and similar high value, time-sensitive products and inputs.”

“The launch of the IDZ will highlight the continuous efforts by government to promote industrialisation and create awareness about the SEZ programme, and its potential to grow the economy and create jobs through creating a conducive environment for foreign direct investment.” Source: Transportworldafrica.co.za with images from dubetradeport.co.za.

SARS Customs New NII Ste - DurbanSARS Customs recently launched its new X-Ray cargo inspection facility adjacent to the Durban Container Terminal in the Port of Durban. Following the trend as in other countries, SARS has identified non-intrusive inspection capability as part of its ‘tiered’ approach to risk management.

In 2008, SARS introduced its very first mobile x-ray scanner which was located inside the Durban container terminal precinct as part of South Africa’s participation in the US Container Security Initiative (CSI). While it has proven itself in the development of Customs NII capability, its location and lack of integration with other Customs automated tools has limited its success.

The new Customs inspection facility is a step-up in technology and automation – a Nuctech MB 1215HL Relocatable Container/Vehicle Inspection System. It has some significant advantages over the original mobile version namely –

  • An efficient and cost-effective security solution with a relatively small footprint (site size).
  • 6 Mev dual energy X-Ray technology with high penetration (through 330 mm of steel).
  • High throughput of 20-25 units of 40ft container vehicles per hour.
  • A unique modular gantry design which improves system relocatability.
  • Self-shielding architecture which requires no additional radiation protection wall.
  • Advanced screening and security features such as organic/inorganic material discrimination.
  • High quality scanning image manipulation tools allowing the customs image reviewer the ability to verify and distinguish the contents of a vehicle or cargo container.

Since its launch more than 350 scans have been performed. Suspect containers were sent for full unpack resulting in various positive findings.

The new relocatable scanner is easier to operate and significantly faster than the mobile scanner. In addition, scanned images are now automatically integrated into SARS Customs case management and inspection software making case management both seamless and efficient.

It is anticipated that until October 2014, both the new scanner and the existing mobile scanner operations will co-exist. During this time, the new scanner will operate risk generated cases directly from SARS automated risk engine. Unscheduled or random interventions will continue to occur at the old scanner site, which operates 24/7.

Plans are in place to decommission the mobile scanner after October 2014. The new scanner will then operate on a 24/7 basis.

BagamoyoThe government of Tanzania has announced that successful negotiation with Chinese officials will allow work to start on the $11bn Bagamoyo megaport this year, rather than January 2015, as originally scheduled.

The port is to be developed by China Merchants Holdings International, the world largest independent port operators. In the first phase of work, the quay, the container yards, the cargo terminals and all dredging work will be completed by 2017.

These facilities will then be expanded in stages over a period of 30 years, to give an eventual capacity of 20 million containers a year. This is likely to make the port the largest on the east coast of Africa, with a capability to handle roll on, roll off ships and container vessels with a 10,000 TEU capacity (these is, “new Panamax” ships that are too large to fit in the Panama Canal).

Underwriting the development is the discovery of some 200 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, which is going to make the country a leading exporter over the next decade.

Bagamoyo is seen as a Tanzania’s trump card in the sharpening struggle with other east African companies for foreign investment, export markets, industrial development and business from landlocked countries in the interior.

In particular, Tanzania is competing with the Kenyan port of Mombasa for investment and the handling of exports from Uganda, Burundi, Zambia and Rwanda. Although it looks to be in the lead in terms of port infrastructure, Kenya has taken the lead in the development of effective rail links, and Mozambique is closer to bringing its liquid natural gas deposits to market.

When completed, the port will cover about 800 hectares. Around it will be a 1,700 hectare special economic zone. The intention is to encourage set up industries that process or refine Tanzania’s raw materials, such as coffee roasting or ore processing, thereby capturing more of the value chain.

Adelhelm Meru, the director general of the Export Processing Zones Authority, which will be in charge of the zone, told journalists in Dar es Salaam recently that he wanted to attract “industries specialising in value-addition of agricultural products” which he said had been a leading area of investment under the EPZA for the past six years. He said about 55% of industries established under the EPZA dealt in agricultural and textile processing.

The zone is expected to be fully developed by 2024. Source: Global Contruction Review

Picture1Due to overwhelming interest in the SARS Customs Detector Dog Unit, a dedicated page is now included – see the Detector Dog ‘tab’ at the top of this webpage for a direct link, or click here!

awb_welcomeIt is becoming more and more evident that every ‘automation’ project entails ‘more costs’. The benefits appear to lie in the ‘comfort’ of doing stuff at your keyboard. Much vaunted ‘cost-savings’ are a myth as technology encroaches every facet of global trading. The following is a fine example.

The trade association for UK freight forwarders and logistics service providers is encouraging its members to object to a Paper Air Waybill (AWB) Surcharge that airlines are planning for export AWBs that are not filed electronically. Robert Keen, director general of the British International Freight Association (Bifa), commented: “Bifa supports e-Commerce and e-Air Waybill implementation in the air cargo supply chain. However, we believe that implementation should create value for forwarders and airlines alike, and airlines need to recognise the costs that the originator of the information incurs to enter and transmit data.”

Keen continued: “Through our international body Fiata, Bifa will be voicing our objection to carriers that seek to apply yet another surcharge, and create yet another revenue stream, under the guise of supporting IATA’s – the airline industry body’s – e-Freight initiative, which aims to implement e-Freight worldwide.” Bifa is asking its members to join in the stand against the introduction of this surcharge by completing an online survey, which can be found here: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/1782849/Paper-AWB-Surcharge-Survey

The air freight sector missed IATA’s target last year of achieving 20% e-air waybill penetration “on feasible lanes”, achieving just 12%. The target for 2014 has been revised downwards to 22%, with a target for 45% e-AWB penetration by the end of 2015 and 80% by the end of 2016. IATA expects to see an acceleration of penetration levels this year, in part because of the introduction last year of the e-AWB Multilateral Agreement, to which around 70 airlines and more than 100 freight forwarders have now signed up.

But while there is increasing momentum among airlines and air cargo handlers, many forwarders remain unconvinced of the benefits. Chuck Zhao, process engineer project manager at US air cargo handler Consolidated Aviation Services (CAS), observes that only around 6% shipments out of the US are e-freight, largely because “those who cut the paper air waybills simply do not see the benefits of going paperless”.

Michael White, assistant director of cargo facilitation, security and standards for US air freight association Cargo Network Services (CNS) and regional manager of cargo for IATA, observed that there was a need for effective communication routes for the forwarders, especially small and medium-sized ones, to transmit their FWB & FHL messages – preferably a community system rather than via multiple airline portals. He said there was currently no community system in the US, but there were signs that companies are looking at that capability. Source: Lloydsloadinglist.com

singapore-port

Port of Singapore

Projected throughput four years from now compares with 642m teu in 2013 and 674m teu projected for this year. The 2018 projection is double the 2004 throughput figure of 363m teu.

The combination of faster traffic growth and strong profit levels is attracting aggressive new players to enter the container terminal-operator business , according to the 11th Global Container Terminal Operators Annual Review and Forecast report published by shipping consultancy Drewry. It says Africa and Greater China are the regions that will see the most rapid growth.

Overall , growth rates are expected to average an annual 5.6% in the five years to 2018, compared with 3.4% in 2013. That will boost average terminal utilisation from 67% today to 75% in 2018, Drewry forecasts.

“The sector’s strong financial performance and accelerating growth is encouraging new market entrants and renewed merger and acquisition activity in the container ports sector,” said Neil Davidson, senior analyst in Drewry’s ports and terminals practice. “Financial investors are particularly active at present, attracted by typical ebitda margins of between 20% and 45%.”

Drewry has also added two companies to its league table of 24 terminal operators it considers to be global. Both China Merchants Holdings International and Bolloré Group have been growing aggressively. In the case of CMHI further acquisitions are particularly likely. Other operators, such as Gulftainer and Yilport are also expanding rapidly and are challenging for inclusion in Drewry’s league table.

The composition of the top five players, when measured on an equity teu throughput basis, has changed little from last year, except new entrant CMHI which is now in fifth place. PSA again heads the table, by virtue of its scale and 20% stake in Hutchison Port Holdings which comes second. APM Terminals is third, followed by DP World.

Drewry said that by 2018, it expects both HPH and APM Terminals to be vying closely for the top spot in terms of capacity deployed. Most portfolio expansion will be through greenfield or brownfield terminals in emerging markets, led by APM Terminals, International Container Terminal Services, HPH and DP World. “All port and terminal operators are experiencing a number of key industry trends, some of which have wide ramifications,” said Mr Davidson. “The most important trends are deployment of ever-larger containerships, expansion of shipping-line alliances, financial pressures on shipping lines, rapidly emerging international terminal operators and owners, financial investor churn, as well as the gathering pace of terminal automation.” Source: Lloydslist.com

o-ECIGS-570It seems the ‘e-industry’ is the vehicle for the next generation of contraband and illicit goods and Im not alluding to the electronics and entertainment industry here. While the World Health Organisation urges a ban on marketing of e-cigarettes, will the need for governments to consider taxes on such become necessary …read on:

E-cigarettes are following in the footsteps of their none-lectronic predecessors by utilizing advertising means no longer available to traditional cigarettes and increasing their ad spending on techniques such as television commercials, promotions, events, sample giveaways, celebrity endorsers, and slogans such as “A perfect puff every time.”

Electronic cigarettes are battery-powered devices that heat a nicotine solution into a vapor inhaled by users. While the chemicals of tobacco cigarettes are not included, the addictive feature of nicotine remains. The use of e-cigarettes has climbed steadily, with 6 percent of all adult Americans and 21 percent of adult smokers trying them in 2011, nearly twice the rates in 2010, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Unlike tobacco cigarettes, which are heavily regulated, e-cigarettes are free from laws that limit their methods of marketing. As a result, brands such as Blu eCigs have spent $12.4 million on advertising for the first quarter of 2013, up from less than $1 million last year. They feature endorsements from actor Stephen Dorff and personality Jenny McCarthy. Traditional cigarette companies such as Lorillard and Reynolds are also getting in on the action by purchasing or launching their own lines of e-cigarettes.

The advertising itself even references tobacco cigarettes, with campaigns that seek to make smoking acceptable again. In a Blu eCigs ad, for example, Dorff praises e-cigarettes because they can be smoked “at a basketball game . . . in a bar with your friends . . . virtually anywhere,” adding, “Come on, guys, rise from the ashes.”

But with the increased profile may come regulation.

“It is beyond troubling that e-cigarettes are using the exact same marketing tactics we saw the tobacco industry use in the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s, which made it so effective for tobacco products to reach youth,” Matthew L. Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, told The New York Times. “The real threat is whether, with this marketing, e-cigarette makers will undo 40 years of efforts to deglamorize smoking.”

WHO urges countries to adopt global guidelines that will end the indoor use of e-cigs. WHO also calls for a ban on marketing practices that could encourage children and non-smokers to use e-cigs.

States such as Indiana, New Jersey, North Dakota, Mississippi, and Utah have already extended restrictions on tobacco cigarettes to include e-cigarettes, while other states such as California and Pennsylvania are considering similar laws. Inhalation of e-cigarettes is prohibited on Amtrak trains and onboard U.S. planes.

The Food and Drug Administration is said to be planning the release of proposed regulations in October. Referencing a report from the financial group CLSA Americas, AdAge reported that the agency is expected to propose a ban on TV advertising to set limits on sales to minors, implement the possibility of a warning label, and restrict online sales. An FDA spokesperson said she could not comment on specifics of a proposed rule, but that the agency “intends to propose a regulation that would extend the agency’s ‘tobacco product’ authorities – which currently only apply to cigarettes, cigarette tobacco, roll-your-own tobacco, and smokeless tobacco – to other categories of tobacco products that meet the statutory definition of ‘tobacco product.’ Further research is needed to assess the potential public health benefits and risks of electronic cigarettes and other novel tobacco products.”

Why it matters: The increasing use and potential regulation of e-cigarettes may trigger another round of tobacco wars between industry and the government. Debate about the product remains – is it an alternative form of smoking, or a means of quitting, like nicotine gum? Should e-cigarettes be taxed and regulated like traditional tobacco products, with age limits, warning labels, and a ban on certain forms of advertising such as TV, or are they a separate and distinct category of products? If and when the FDA wades into the issue, the fight will truly begin. Source: Manatt Phelps & Phillips LLP

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Tobacco-Wars-350x207The Business Times article “BAT hauled to court over spy claims” published Sunday, 31 August reveals, if nothing else, a web of spying and skulduggery within the tobacco industry. Guaranteed we haven’t heard the last of this saga yet……read on:

British American Tobacco (BAT) could have its dirty linen aired in court following a sensational high court application launched by local “value brand” producer Carnilinx for alleged “corporate espionage”.

In the application, Carnilinx director Kyle Phillips claimed BAT paid Pretoria attorney Belinda Walter for commercially sensitive information she obtained while “infiltrating ” the company and the FairTrade Independent Tobacco Association (Fita) in 2012 and 2013. If this goes to trial, these spy claims could be extremely damaging for BAT, which is based in London and is the largest company listed on the JSE Securities Exchange, worth R1.26-trillion.

“BAT has used unlawful means to interfere in the business of the applicant. It has paid [Walter] monies to spy [on Carnilinx],” Mr Phillips claimed.

Ms Walter acted as the attorney to Carnilinx and as chairwoman of Fita, an industry body ostensibly established to represent South Africa’s smaller tobacco manufacturers.

Carnilinx is headed by Adriano Mazzotti, who donated cash to the Economic Freedom Fighters, which helped it to contest the May election.

Mr Mazzotti’s company is asking the court to interdict Ms Walter from providing any further information to BAT and to stop BAT unlawfully “interfering with its trade”.

Carnilinx’s application is based on Ms Walter’s “confession” during a meeting in February, in which she detailed her role as an informant for the government’s State Security Agency, which allegedly introduced her to Forensic Security Services (FSS).

This private security firm works for the Tobacco Institute of SA (Tisa), which represents the larger tobacco producers, notably BAT.

This journalist witnessed Ms Walter’s admissions at that meeting. In its legal papers, Carnilinx said FSS then “introduced Walter to BAT, to whom she would give information on the smaller manufacturers”.

Mr Phillips goes further, saying Ms Walter proposed creating Fita in the first place so “she could infiltrate all the smaller tobacco manufacturers”.

“The first Fita meeting was held late in 2012, at Walter’s offices, which Walter admits with her compliance and knowledge was bugged by FSS.

For the information she fed to BAT, Walter was paid,” he said. In Ms Walter’s opposing affidavit, filed on Friday, she claimed she was under “extreme emotional distress” during that meeting with Carnilinx in February, because of physical threats against her and her son.

She denied “any commercial or attorney-client relationship with BAT South Africa”, and said she was “nothing but a thorn in their side”.

When asked by the Sunday Times this week, Ms Walter did not deny that she fed information to BAT’s London office, or that she had knowingly allowed the first Fita meeting to be recorded by FSS. But she said the leaking of information was common practice among Fita members.

Instead, in her court papers, she mounted a scathing attack on her former client, Carnilinx.

“Carnilinx also attempts to paint a picture that they are ‘victims’, choir boys in the church choir. This is simply not the case,” she claimed.

Ms Walter said she could say “with confidence” that almost all Fita members provided information on each other to law-enforcement agencies about widespread “dealings in illicit products and criminal activities”.

She claimed Carnilinx employed “its own investigators to spy on competitors, rat out its competitors to law-enforcement agencies and provide substantial information on illicit trade of its competitors to the South African Revenue Service” (SARS), and that “at least one Carnilinx director is a paid SARS informant”.

Ms Walter resigned as attorney to Carnilinx, and soon after as chairwoman of Fita last November after becoming romantically involved with the head of SARS’s enforcement division, Johann van Loggerenberg.

That relationship ended “acrimoniously “, prompting Ms Walter to lay complaints with SARS against Van Loggerenberg, in which she claims he divulged confidential taxpayer information relating to his investigations into Carnilinx, among others.

Now Carnilinx is claiming Ms Walter “fed information on Carnilinx to SARS “. In response, Ms Walter alleged that Carnilinx was offered “tax leniency” in exchange for filing the application against her — an allegation Mr Mazzotti has denied.

Ms Walter has asked the court to order that if this case goes ahead, SARS and Mr Van Loggerenberg should be “forced to put pen to paper and make affidavits in response to my allegations of the corrupt conduct and collusion in this malicious and vexatious application”. Source: The Sunday Times (Business Times)

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Reefer Owners Beware

September 3, 2014 — Leave a comment

reeferThe Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries appears to have adopted a concerning stance on the requirements of the Marine Living Resources Act regarding the licensing of vessels entering South African waters. The policy affects reefer vessels in particular and owners are advised to pay attention to this development.

Among other things, the act requires that every foreign-flagged fishing vessel entering the South African exclusive economic zone apply for and obtain a fishing permit. A ‘fishing vessel’ is defined in the act as any vessel, boat, ship or other craft which is used for, equipped to be used for or of a type that is normally used for fishing or related activities, and includes all gear, equipment, stores, cargo and fuel onboard. Further, the term ‘related activities’ is defined as including:

  • storing, buying, selling, transshipping, processing or transporting fish or any fish product taken from South African waters up to the time it is first landed or in the course of high seas fishing;
  • storing, buying, selling or processing fish or any fish product onshore from the time it is first landed;
  • refuelling or supplying fishing vessels, selling or supplying fishing equipment or performing any other act in support of fishing;
  • exporting and importing fish or any fish product; and
  • providing agency, consultancy or other similar services for and in relation to fishing or a related activity.

It is a criminal offence to undertake fishing or related activities without the requisite licence. The penalties for contravention include a number of measures which may be taken by a fishery control officer, such as seizure of the vessel concerned or the arrest of anyone whom the fishery control officer has reasonable grounds to suspect has committed an offence in terms of the act.

The act seems to be sufficiently clear; what is concerning is the manner in which fishery control officers are implementing it. For example, in a recent case the fishery control officers in Cape Town conducted a raid in the port and seized a reefer vessel which had called for medical assistance to a crew member and undertook subsequent repairs, on the grounds that the vessel had no fishing licence onboard. There was no suggestion by the officers that the vessel was actually engaged in fishing or related activities. Instead, the officers’ view was that an offence had been committed by the mere fact that the vessel was capable of carrying fish and had entered the South Africa exclusive economic zone without a fishing permit. On a plain reading of the act, no criminal offence had been committed on the facts of the case. The reasonable inference is that the fishery control officers had acted outside the scope of the act.

Perhaps the most worrying aspect was that, in the face of a legal challenge to the seizure notice, the fishery control officers took it upon themselves to arrest the master of the vessel with the assistance of the South African Police Services at 7:00pm before the vessel was due to depart, so that the master might be prosecuted in the magistrates’ court under the act unless he paid an admission of guilt fine.

The extent to which actions of this nature by the department will continue is unknown, but until the fishing industry or lobby groups can get a clear understanding of the department’s policy, it is advisable for reefer owners (in particular) to canvass the issue with their local port agents well in advance of calling at South Africa. Source: Bowman Gilfillan

20140827%20154452At the invitation of the “Institut de l’Entreprise” in the framework of its programme “Entretiens Enseignants-Entreprises”, WCO Secretary General Kunio Mikuriya spoke at the Summer University’s conference entitled “La croissance en question(s)” (growth into question(s)) in the Veolia Campus, Jouy-le-Moutier, France on 27 August 2014.

Supported by the French ministry of Education and the Council of Economic Analysis, this forum gives the opportunity to high school teachers in economics and social sciences to exchange views with the business world. It also provides them with an opportunity to update their knowledge on current economic issues benefiting from the attendance of renowned economists and prominent business leaders.

260 High school teachers participated in the event and listened to a panel session on poverty reduction during which Secretary General Mikuriya explained the contribution of Customs through enhancing connectivity at the borders to secure and facilitate global supply chain. They were eager to understand how the WCO and Customs could play a significant role in trade facilitation to convey the messages to their classrooms. Source: WCO

imagesCAQOK2YRKuehne + Nagel has introduced what it claims is the freight forwarding industry’s most advanced environmental emissions calculator tool, providing “exact data” on sea freight and intermodal shipments.

K+N said it had been “continuously enhancing its CO2 emission calculating capabilities and is the first to offer its customers exact data instead of estimations”. The Global Seafreight Carbon Calculator (GSCC) allows calculations of CO2, SOx and NOx emissions for container and LCL movements from door-to-door.

Built upon the European Standard EN 16258, it said the GSCC is a planning support tool that helps customers to calculate and model complex supply chains. The underlying methodology of the programme is based on the Clean Cargo Working Group standards for CO2 emissions, whereby an individual trade lane-based CO2 footprint per gramme/TEU/km can be obtained. Additionally the GSCC features detailed information about SOx.

K+N said the GSCC also provides: real-time CO2 emissions; a calculation model for strategic carbon footprint simulation; a high-level overview of CO2 emissions for sea and intermodal transport; carrier-based CO2 emissions reports.

On request, Kuehne + Nagel can also provide customer-specific CO2 emission reports with its advanced Global Transport Carbon Calculator. This tool is designed to monitor carbon emissions from specific transport activities and the reports include actual ocean carrier emissions data provided by individual carriers.

K+N said the data was fully integrated into the KN Login platform and allows scalable reports per trade lane, region, country, mode of transport and carrier. Source: http://www.kn-portal.com

BwNodecCIAAquJ4Kenya Defense Forces have destroyed a ship laden with heroin worth $11.3 million off the coast of Mombasa. The act is a message that the Port of Mombasa will no longer be a passage for the importation of illicit drugs, says the Head of State.

A reported 370 kilograms of heroin were blown up together with the stateless Al Noor ship on Friday in an operation witnessed by President Uhuru Kenyatta from a military helicopter overflying the Indian Ocean.

The vessel was mounted with explosives which were detonated some 16 nautical miles south of the coastal town of Mombasa, where it then sunk to the seabed.

A Mombasa High Court judge had earlier issued an order stopping the destruction of ship. A local lawyer had made a submission to stop the ship’s obliteration on behalf of his client, who was not named in court. However, presidential orders seemed to trump the court order.

Additionally, nine foreigners have been charged with trafficking the heroin at the Mombasa High Court. The drugs were seized from the 1,800 liters of the ship’s diesel reservoir on July 15 where they were concealed when it was intercepted off the Kenyan coast in Lamu by Kenya navy officers. Source: The Star (Kenya)

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product_tsaprecheck_hero_750x200The U.S. Department of Homeland Security recently achieved two major milestones for its trusted traveler programs. The Transportation Security Administration Pre✓ application program, which began in December 2013, has now enrolled more than half a million travelers.

Additionally, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has enrolled more than three million users in their trusted traveler programs: Global Entry, NEXUS and SENTRI. Together, all of these DHS trusted traveler programs provide an improved passenger experience, while enhancing security and increasing system-wide efficiencies.

TSA Pre✓ allows low-risk travelers to experience faster, more efficient screening at 118 U.S. airports nationwide currently. TSA Pre✓ is an expedited screening program that allows pre-approved airline travelers to leave on their shoes, light outerwear and belt, keep their laptop in its case and their 3-1-1 compliant liquids/gels bag in a carry-on in select screening lanes.

The TSA Pre✓ application program allows U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents to directly enroll in TSA Pre✓. Once approved, travelers will receive a “Known Traveler Number” and will have the opportunity to utilize TSA Pre✓ lanes at select security checkpoints when flying on a participating carrier: Air Canada, Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Hawaiian Airlines, JetBlue Airways, Southwest Airlines, Sun Country Airlines, United Airlines, US Airways and Virgin America.

Upon arrival in the United States from abroad, Global Entry members are able to bypass the traditional CBP inspection lines and use an automated kiosk. With more than 70,000 new applicants each month, travelers enrolled in this program can scan their passport and fingerprints, answer the customs declaration questions using the kiosk’s touch screen and proceed with a receipt — the whole process only takes about one minute. Launched in 2008, as a pilot program, Global Entry is now a permanent program and has 51 locations in the U.S. and at CBP Preclearance stations in Canada. These locations serve 99 percent of incoming travelers to the United States. Source: dhs.gov